Restoration Project: 1952 MG TD

Written by on December 21, 2018 in MG, Restoration with 5 Comments

MG TD Restoration

Here we go on yet another MG TD restoration! This is a project that’s been in the making for over twenty years. The two owners have been coming into the shop to talk with us about the project for years and have finally decided to pull the trigger and get started. This particular TD is a 1952 and was our client’s first car. It’s provided many years of joy and great memories for our client and her family. The car was set aside and put into storage many years ago. They would now like it restored back to its former glory so that they and their family can continue to enjoy it for many years to come. It was in pretty solid shape when we got our hands on it, but there was clearly much work to do to return it to its former glory.

MG TD Restoration

They want the car restored to a very nice show standard, so for this reason we’ve completely disassembled the car and will be going over every nut and bolt making the car virtually brand new. The chassis has been completely stripped and powder coated. We like to use powder coating on the chassis because it is very durable and gets in tight corners that paint has a difficult time covering. The drivetrain is all completely rebuilt and better than new.

MG TD Restoration

Chassis back from powder coating.

The body on the car looks to be very solid and appears to have very little accident damage or rust. The body is now at the media blasters, so we’ll get a much better look and feel for what we are working with once it returns. We’ll be taking a very close look at the wood structure that the body fits to. It is very common on T-series cars to have wood rot and rust hiding behind the framing. This will be a very cool project, so please check back to watch at this TD comes back to life.

MG TD Restoration

This project is rolling!

Comments and questions are always welcome, and make sure to check back for updates. You can also hop on over and like us on Facebook where we announce new posts on all ongoing restoration projects.

Click on any of the following thumbnails for full-size photos. You can navigate through the slides by clicking on the right and left-hand arrows on the photo or using the < and > keys on your keyboard.

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  1. John E McFadden says:

    Hey Justin,
    Just ran across your site & have been roaming through the pictures.
    I have a 1951 TD with right hand steering.
    My dad had the car when I was young & I actually started driving when I got my license. Drove for about 3 years, Bought a new car in 1972 & decided to upgrade / restore the TD.
    Had good intentions but lacked proper knowledge.
    Disassembled car pretty much completely. Worked on off & on for couple years, got married, had child with health problems & TD got put on back burner.
    At this point car is somewhat back together. Body back together & on frame with all new wood. Had replaced all rubber pieces & many parts worn out.
    Has been setting in this state for 20+ years.
    Maybe your site & pictures will get me motivated to finally finish.
    Is it possible to get guidance or suggestions from your firm on problems with further restoration?
    Thanks from North Carolina.

  2. Yandolle says:

    Awesome man

  3. Julian Porte says:

    Fascinating article!

  4. Mike F in Charlotte says:

    Looks like a cool project! I just purchased a ’52 TD with rotten bottom main rails so I’m especially interested in pictures showing how the wood is attached to the tub. I was hoping to replace the wood without removing the tub but I’ve been told that this would be very difficult to do.

  5. Classic Car says:

    This looks like an awesome project. Looks like you have some real Classic Car Restoration going on. I will be following this.

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